from the Archives

The New Yorker Hotel

The New Yorker Hotel once stood at 1611 Collins Avenue. It was the destruction of this iconic 1940 hotel in January 1981, considered by some the masterpiece of local architect Henry Hohauser, that really sparked the historic preservation passion in Miami Beach. Barbara Baer Capitman and other preservationists won national attention when they briefly lay down in front of the bulldozers in a vain attempt to block the demolition. Its symbol became the rallying point for those seeking local designation of the Historic District. In fact, the Miami Design Preservation League uses the image of the New Yorker in its current day logo. That logo was designed by architect Andres Fabregas, who also designed Miami Beach’s “new” City Hall and the logo for Miami Beach and also happened to be MDPL’s first President.

After the New Yorker Hotel was demolished, the lot stood vacant for many years until 1998 when the Loews Hotel was built.

Front side of 1949 brochure for Hotel New Yorker
Reverse side of 1949 brochure for Hotel New Yorker
1960’s photograph of the New Yorker Hotel

Miami Herald article “Beauty is in Eye of Deco Defender”; courtesy of Miami Herald archives
Miami Design Preservation League uses the image of the New Yorker Hotel
in its current day logo

1950's postcard of The New Yorker Hotel at 1611 Collins Ave

What would Miami Beach be like without Historic Art Deco, Mediterranean, and MiMo buildings?

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